States mandating e dating website for kids under 12

“The main impact of it is first…to spend TANF money that could go into other things,” said Elizabeth Lower-Basch, policy coordinator and director of income and work supports at CLASP, a non-profit focused on policy for low-income individuals.

While many states told Think Progress that the funds don’t necessarily come out of the pot that would go to TANF benefits, it’s still money that could go elsewhere.

Over the first five months, 3,656 TANF applicants were screened for use of illegal substances and 38 were referred for drug testing. A Mississippi Department of Human Services spokeswoman told Think Progress that the agency “has contracts in place for the screening (SASSI) and any subsequent tests (Med Screens).

The cost per SASSI is less than .00 per screening.

“If people are afraid they’ll lose their benefits if they admit to using drugs, it makes it hard for them to say, ‘Hey, actually I have this issue,’” she explained.

A study of Florida’s program, which has since been struck down by the courts, found that it didn’t produce any reliable estimates of drug use among welfare recipients.

The statistics show that applicants actually test positive at a lower rate than the drug use of the general population. In these states, however, the rate of positive drug tests to total welfare applicants ranges from 0.002 percent to 8.3 percent, but all except one have a rate below 1 percent.

Meanwhile, they’ve collectively spent nearly

“The main impact of it is first…to spend TANF money that could go into other things,” said Elizabeth Lower-Basch, policy coordinator and director of income and work supports at CLASP, a non-profit focused on policy for low-income individuals.While many states told Think Progress that the funds don’t necessarily come out of the pot that would go to TANF benefits, it’s still money that could go elsewhere.Over the first five months, 3,656 TANF applicants were screened for use of illegal substances and 38 were referred for drug testing. A Mississippi Department of Human Services spokeswoman told Think Progress that the agency “has contracts in place for the screening (SASSI) and any subsequent tests (Med Screens).The cost per SASSI is less than $2.00 per screening.“If people are afraid they’ll lose their benefits if they admit to using drugs, it makes it hard for them to say, ‘Hey, actually I have this issue,’” she explained.A study of Florida’s program, which has since been struck down by the courts, found that it didn’t produce any reliable estimates of drug use among welfare recipients.The statistics show that applicants actually test positive at a lower rate than the drug use of the general population. In these states, however, the rate of positive drug tests to total welfare applicants ranges from 0.002 percent to 8.3 percent, but all except one have a rate below 1 percent.Meanwhile, they’ve collectively spent nearly $1 million on the effort, and millions more may have to be spent in coming years.

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“The main impact of it is first…to spend TANF money that could go into other things,” said Elizabeth Lower-Basch, policy coordinator and director of income and work supports at CLASP, a non-profit focused on policy for low-income individuals.

While many states told Think Progress that the funds don’t necessarily come out of the pot that would go to TANF benefits, it’s still money that could go elsewhere.

Over the first five months, 3,656 TANF applicants were screened for use of illegal substances and 38 were referred for drug testing. A Mississippi Department of Human Services spokeswoman told Think Progress that the agency “has contracts in place for the screening (SASSI) and any subsequent tests (Med Screens).

The cost per SASSI is less than $2.00 per screening.

“If people are afraid they’ll lose their benefits if they admit to using drugs, it makes it hard for them to say, ‘Hey, actually I have this issue,’” she explained.

A study of Florida’s program, which has since been struck down by the courts, found that it didn’t produce any reliable estimates of drug use among welfare recipients.

The statistics show that applicants actually test positive at a lower rate than the drug use of the general population. In these states, however, the rate of positive drug tests to total welfare applicants ranges from 0.002 percent to 8.3 percent, but all except one have a rate below 1 percent.

Meanwhile, they’ve collectively spent nearly $1 million on the effort, and millions more may have to be spent in coming years.

million on the effort, and millions more may have to be spent in coming years.

In 2011, Missouri adopted a law to require screening and testing for all TANF applicants, and the testing began in March 2013.

It can increase the shame people feel around applying for welfare benefits in the first place, which could drive them away from getting assistance they may need to get by.

At the same time, it may make drug users less willing to disclose and therefore keep them from connecting with treatment, according to Lower-Basch.

Lawmakers who push these bills claim that they will cut down on costs by rooting out drug abusers while also helping to refer those users to treatment.

But in reality, they come with few, if any, benefits.

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